Birmingham Twestival

13th February 2009

Twestival , or Twitter Festival, was an idea which originated in London last year.  Then, people who knew each other online through their Twitter communities organised a social event to raise money for local homeless charities.  Yesterday, Twestival events were held around the world to benefit Charity: Water a non-profit organisation funding small scale water projects in developing world countries.

Birmingham Twestival was held at Poppy Red in The Arcadian.  It was a very well attended event which has raised £1519.  It also shows that when people meet online nowadays it has become a lot more natural to then meet up in real life, something that has also been evident in Birmingham with the success of the Social Media Cafe.

And Birmingham social media is doing so much more than charity fundraising.  From the sort of civic engagement/consultation work that was done with Big City Talk to people like @StuartParker and We Share Stuff who are using social media with young offenders, Birmingham is leading the way in finding social purposes for new media technologies.

One thing that was noticeable yesterday was how young(ish), white and middle class most of us were.  In a city as rich in diversity as Birmingham is I think that presents significant challenges to those of us with an interest in social media as a tool for inclusivity.

But that’s meant as an observation and not as a criticism of last night’s event.  So, well done and a big thank you to the BrumTwestival organisers – and I nearly forgot to say what a thoroughly enjoyable night they laid on, didn’t I?  Well, they did.   It was a lot of fun, most of which I won’t put on a work blog ;0)

2 Responses to “Birmingham Twestival”

  1. Stuart Parker Says:

    Good to catch up with you Si. We chatted briefly about the inclusivity issue.I don’t think it’s the case that the technology is only being utilised by the white middle classes. It’s more that the networks exist outside of our chosen circles. Where we can, we need to engage with these networks to be able to share our knowledge. Trust and confidence are key factors in making this happen. Of course, it will take time to embed a culture of everyday online usage where it doesn’t exist. We need to be creative in how we overcome the barriers and apathy towards technology.

  2. Podnosh Blog » Archive » What Amanda Learnt from Twestival Says:

    [...] Digital Birmingham’s Simon Whitehouse wrote: “So, well done and a big thank you to the BrumTwestival organisers – and I nearly forgot to say what a thoroughly enjoyable night they laid on, didn’t I?  Well, they did.   It was a lot of fun, most of which I won’t put on a work blog ;0)” [...]

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